“I’m here today because I am gay. And because maybe I can make a difference. To help others have an easier and more hopeful time. Regardless, for me, I feel a personal obligation and a social responsibility. I also do it selfishly, because I am tired of hiding and I am tired of lying by omission. I suffered for years because I was scared to be out. My spirit suffered, my mental health suffered and my relationships suffered.”
 Ellen Page comes out (x)

:)

(Source: missdontcare-x)

:3

:3

(Source: onlyforyou56)

marxism-leninism-utenaism:

trashthetics:

accaern:

besturlonhere:

cornerof5thandvermouth:


"The friendly and peaceful Clefairy is admired by many for its magical powers." - The Official Pokemon Handbook

"Moreover, if the individual probabilities for each frequency class are summed, the result is 1.0." -Practical Statistics for Field Biology

i got the rules for chess according to the associated press style guide

"excōgitō, v.t. to think out” Teach Yourself Latin Dictionary 
lol

"Lupe, you’re crazy," said María.  (The Savage Detectives, Roberto Bolaño)

"She flattered him; she fooled him, thought Clarissa; shaping the woman, the wife of the Major in the Indian Army, with three strokes of a knife." (Mrs. Dalloway)

“The ground was a black ash desert, with heat-seared patches of glass and melted marble that reflected the sunlight until they were crunched underfoot”
sounds about right.

marxism-leninism-utenaism:

trashthetics:

accaern:

besturlonhere:

cornerof5thandvermouth:

"The friendly and peaceful Clefairy is admired by many for its magical powers." - The Official Pokemon Handbook

"Moreover, if the individual probabilities for each frequency class are summed, the result is 1.0." -Practical Statistics for Field Biology

i got the rules for chess according to the associated press style guide

"excōgitō, v.t. to think out” Teach Yourself Latin Dictionary 

lol

"Lupe, you’re crazy," said María.  (The Savage Detectives, Roberto Bolaño)

"She flattered him; she fooled him, thought Clarissa; shaping the woman, the wife of the Major in the Indian Army, with three strokes of a knife." (Mrs. Dalloway)

“The ground was a black ash desert, with heat-seared patches of glass and melted marble that reflected the sunlight until they were crunched underfoot”

sounds about right.

(Source: rhamphotheca)

i love me some fucking Lymond

weirdsociology:

drseahorse:

languish-locked-in-l:

Just fucking, or…?

Probably. I doubt I could hold his interest longer term, I haven’t memorised enough obscure renaissance plays and my wordplay isn’t up to snuff.

Let’s get real, that’s, like, all of us. All of us put…

But to answer your question I’d jump right into those books in an instant given the chance, and I would offer Francis a whole lot of good advice, what kind I’m sure you could guess, and if he took it European history would never be the same again (but who cares).

i love me some fucking Lymond

weirdsociology:

drseahorse:

languish-locked-in-l:

Just fucking, or…?

Probably. I doubt I could hold his interest longer term, I haven’t memorised enough obscure renaissance plays and my wordplay isn’t up to snuff.

Let’s get real, that’s, like, all of us. All of us put…

It’s so fun telling about this stuff with people who Get It.

i love me some fucking Lymond

languish-locked-in-l:

Just fucking, or…?

Probably.  I doubt I could hold his interest longer term, I haven’t memorised enough obscure renaissance plays and my wordplay isn’t up to snuff.

(Source: drseahorse)

I describe myself as only mostly gay because although I’ve never met a man I wanted to be romantically involved with I see plenty who I find at least somewhat attractive.  I wonder what opened that door, except not really because I actually it’s all about the fictional men who I’d bang to hell and back if they weren’t inconveniently not real.

weirdsociology:

balladedutempsjadis:

weirdsociology:

I’ve always wondered how much of Lymond’s horror at what Philippa undertakes vis-a-vis Leonard Bailey is because he did almost precisely the same thing for Jerott with the Aga Morat.

And that, in turn, makes me wonder exactly what went on there, and how horrible it was.  Dunnett always sort of dances around implications of prior sexual trauma with Lymond, but I’ve always gotten the feeling that we’re certainly meant to read them as present (the galleys).

This got too long for a “reply” so … reblog it is … So, Dangermousie pointed out in one of her lovely metas about Lymond that a beautiful 16-year-old boy in the galleys almost certainly didn’t come out of there unmolested. And I can’t imagine Aga Morat was remotely pleasant for Lymond (I remember wanting to smack Jerrott upside his oblivious head when he was all shocked that Lymond was the Aga’s “catamite” as though he’d done it FOR HIS OWN PLEASURE! *shakes head* Did Jerrott ever figure it out for real?)

I do think there’s an extra level of pain there for Lymond that Philippa sacrificed herself in the same way she did, because a) he loves her (he loves her a lot more than he loves himself at this point, yes?) and b) he doesn’t see her as tainted and scarred as he is (and Leonard Bailey IS her first sexual encounter, yuck!) in the way that he sort of accepted being the sacrificial lamb for Aga Morat, because what was one more gross sexual encounter for him, Mr. Hunchback in the Gutter?

he loves her a lot more than he loves himself at this point, yes?

Not to diminish his love for Philippa, but ha, that is like the lowest of low bars to clear.  I cannot decide whether cackling or weeping is the appropriate reaction here, which.. honestly, is true of most things concerning Francis.

This also sort of brings up another question I’ve always had about Francis, which is, are we meant to read him as (implied) bisexual in his preferences, or are we meant to read him as sexually expedient to get what he needs for other purposes?  Queens’ Play has always been completely ambiguous about this to me; a remark like, "Only the women?” can definitely be read either way, as Francis being Francis (and therefore bisexual and Animal House-y*), or Francis being Francis (and therefore keenly interested in meeting his own political ends through any means necessary).   And, as sgriowrites (I think?) pointed out recently, the thing about Will Scott’s “unnatural” relationship is that Francis is aware of the implications (when is he ever not), and possibly even cultivating them to further his own purposes, so he clearly doesn’t mind being seen as interested in men.

On the other hand, Will is meant to be read as bisexual, or at least very interested in Francis (Francis.. sexual?  Francis-sexual?  I think that term applies to a lot of people**), and that is made explicit, albeit in the most hilarious and subtle of ways.  On the other OTHER hand, Dunnett is famed for her protagonist’s ambiguity, so it would make sense we wouldn’t get the same kind of reveal for Francis that we would for Will.  And I’ve always suspected there’s a very interesting miasma of sexual violence hanging around (AHEM SPOILERS ‘cause I know a few of you are still reading GoK) That One Character Who We Really Hate Who Dies in PiF, and that one of the ways that Francis knew he wasn’t who he presented himself as was a certain level of veiled sexual tension/threat in their relationship which would be inappropriate for That One Character’s chosen religious role.  Which is then, once again, made horrifically clear via That One Character’s threats concerning the children.

Anyway, I prefer to read Lymond as bisexual because yay!  Bisexual protagonists.   And I do think Dunnett was rather daring for her time in terms of the sexual politics of the books.   But I can never quite decide if that’s Word of God or not.

***

*As I think I’ve remarked before, QP is like Lymond: The Animal House Years.

**Including me.  And most of you, I would imagine.  Just… unf.

For what it’s worth I’ve always read Francis as being bisexual too, although I never read as deeply into QP that he might be banging half the French Court for political as well as personal reasons.  

The background of sexual violence in the Lymond Chronicles is very interesting in how it’s communicated, how subtly in almost all cases, and I’m going to go ahead and attribute that to Dunnett being a woman as well as an incredibly talented writer.  

These posts are really making me want to continue my latest readthrough of the Lymond Chronicles, the only problem with that is I’m due to start on DK next and I’m not sure I have the emotional reserve for what’s coming.

balladedutempsjadis:

weirdsociology:

I’ve always wondered how much of Lymond’s horror at what Philippa undertakes vis-a-vis Leonard Bailey is because he did almost precisely the same thing for Jerott with the Aga Morat.

And that, in turn, makes me wonder exactly what went on there, and how horrible it was.  Dunnett always sort of dances around implications of prior sexual trauma with Lymond, but I’ve always gotten the feeling that we’re certainly meant to read them as present (the galleys).

This got too long for a “reply” so … reblog it is … So, Dangermousie pointed out in one of her lovely metas about Lymond that a beautiful 16-year-old boy in the galleys almost certainly didn’t come out of there unmolested. And I can’t imagine Aga Morat was remotely pleasant for Lymond (I remember wanting to smack Jerrott upside his oblivious head when he was all shocked that Lymond was the Aga’s “catamite” as though he’d done it FOR HIS OWN PLEASURE! *shakes head* Did Jerrott ever figure it out for real?)

I do think there’s an extra level of pain there for Lymond that Philippa sacrificed herself in the same way she did, because a) he loves her (he loves her a lot more than he loves himself at this point, yes?) and b) he doesn’t see her as tainted and scarred as he is (and Leonard Bailey IS her first sexual encounter, yuck!) in the way that he sort of accepted being the sacrificial lamb for Aga Morat, because what was one more gross sexual encounter for him, Mr. Hunchback in the Gutter?